• If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.
    Elmore Leonard
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Randolph Lundine Writing Prompts

Writing prompts, news, information, and resources to help expand your writing community, hone your writing habits, and to waste time in a way that feels like you're working on your writing.

Just Write (32)

Can you remember that first movie that changed your life?

When we hit a certain age—I’m going to say approximately 14.5—movies start to take on such mythic status in our lives. We start to see ourselves in these movies.  It's when we think this could (or should) be me--or most powerful of all, I am that girl. So you watch it over and over, to the bafflement of your parents. That they think it’s inane or inconceivable only adds to its perfection.

I came of age in the teen film heyday of the Brat Pack and John Hughes. I can still recite most of the lines from Some Kind of Wonderful and Pretty in Pink. But when you go back and watch these movies (the above two excluded, of course), they’re really awful. The Legend of Billie Jean? Footloose? Sigh.

For today's writing prompt, let’s do a little revisionist history. Pick that movie that meant so much to you and rework it. Make it less schlocky, or silly. Put some truth and soul back in it. Make the girl stronger, or the boy less dull.

If you need inspiration, listen to this great John Hodgman piece from This American Life about rewriting a movie that went so very wrong.

Just Write (33)
Just Write (31)
 

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Monday, 18 November 2019