Rewriting is essential. It's the real work of writing, as you likely know. But it often gets overlooked amongst all of the writing tips and prompts out there. I imagine this is because it's damn scary to start and it's damn boring to rewrite. Drafts are often chaotic and messy--and that's okay (take a breath, it's really okay). Most of us, once we get over how brilliant we are, realize what's on the page is really a hot mess with moments of greatness. The trick is recognizing what's worth saving and what's missing. In Making a Literary Life: Advice for Writers and Other Dreamers, a lovely book in which you'll find a whole chapter on rewriting, Carolyn See offers a very deliberate and practical solution to find your way out of the chaos:

Here's my way of making sense of it (and this works equally well for magazine pieces, fiction, and nonfiction). It sounds like a lot of work, but it's no worse than shelling enough peas for a dinner party for six. I take out some blank paper and a hard copy of whatever it is I'm working on, divide the blank paper vertically [please see previous post re: my luddite ways to understand why I can't figure out how on earth one does this on my fancy computer], draw another line across the top, and label it thus: 

Ch. One

     What I Have                                                       What I Need

 

Then I take a look at my troublesome, chaotic, emotion-packed repetitve manuscript.... If it's a twelve-page story, maybe my map will run a couple of pages; I'll break it down by paragraps. If it's a novel, maybe this map will run ten or twenty pages. But by the time it's done, I'l have a very clear idea about what's going on in this 280-page manuscript.... [T]hen I read the manuscript again, but with my map beside me...I keep reading, no more than two hours at a time, and crossing out (or adding) a word or paragraph at a time. After a while, the items in the right side of my column will get crossed out; they'll get "fixed."